Cyprus Pottery Ceramic Association

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Welcome to the "Cyprus Pottery - Ceramic Association" website. Trough this website you can find information about the work, biography and contact details for each of the association's members. You can also find information and photographs about upcoming or past ceramics exhibitions, in Cyprus and abroad, organized by either the association or individual ceramists.

About Cypriot Ceramists - Potters

Prior to 1974 the main ceramic workshops were based in Kyrenia and surrounding areas, as well as in Famagusta and its district.

The workshops in the Kyrenia area produced mainly glazed ware for every day use, as well as high quality and crafted gifts. The work was done in small units, usually mainly by the families themselves. They used electric furnaces, electric turntables and prepared the clay themselves by obtaining it from the foothills of the Pendadaktylos mountain range. Most of the ceramic items they created, they decorated by hand, glazed and fired at low temperatures (920-980 degrees Celsius). They furthermore made various types of terracotta flowerpots and jugs.

In the Famagusta area there were many workshops in the town as well as in the villages. They produced large pots for every day use (mainly terracotta pots), such as the koukkoumares (jugs), flowerpots, cooking-pots and some decorative vessels. They made the clay themselves and the earth was taken from the Mesaoria plain. They had large furnaces and they used wood to fire at 900-940 degrees Celsius. There were similar workshops also in Nicosia, but fewer in number.

After the Turkish invasion of July 1974, all these potters who consequently became refugees, moved to the south of the island, where some of them reestablished themselves and set up new workshops, whereas others abandoned the trade. Many young people went abroad to study ceramic art and on returning to Cyprus, they opened their own workshops. They brought fresh new ideas and new techniques with them, developing a new outlook on ceramic art from a pure artistic point of view.

With tourism gaining significance on the island, the number of workshops increased and a great percentage of pottery ware was purchased by tourists. Some workshops exported and export in small quantities mainly to Europe. Today there are approximately 40 ceramic workshops, most of them being small units employing one to two people. There are very few large workshops employing more than two people.